What inspired you to create your proposal?

Coming from a sporting background I have witnessed and experienced the benefits sport can have on the wellbeing of youth, that it can be used as a platform to make positive life changes.  The ethos of Transition Extreme charity is something I personally align with and felt impassioned to support architecturally. It also provided an opportunity to explore architecture and wellbeing in some depth, as well as, architecture and the human experience.

What is your best memory of the MArch course?

The best memories from my time on the course are from working within the 5710 society. Meeting and getting to know the visiting architects over dinner after their lectures. It has help me grow personally and has helped me develop my architectural thinking.

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The most challenging part was trying to navigate through integrating factors within this project. It is understood that the more meaning and connection a building has to the people using it the more its success a place may have. Research needed to transcend from purely design detail into understanding how people experience buildings, find comfort, ownership or pride for a space.

I was born and raised in a small village situated on the banks of the river Forth in Fife on the east coast of Scotland. Growing up I have always had a strong interest in making things and exploring how they are built which was on factor that enticed me towards architecture as a profession. I am very active in sports, previously a competitive international swimmer and enjoy various outdoor actives such as paddle boarding, wind surfing and climbing.

Through the course of my university degree, I have developed a passion for architecture in relation to its wider philosophical attitudes and its relationship with the humanities. I have explored this through a few written works, my dissertation achieving nomination for RIBA Dissertation Medal 2019.

Other interests include contributing to the conversations in architecture today. During the 2019/2020 academic session I was a chapter ember of ASA (Aberdeen Society of Architects) and was co-president of the 5710 Architectural Society.

Rachael O'Donnell

Unit One

2020

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What inspired you to create your proposal?

Coming from a sporting background I have witnessed and experienced the benefits sport can have on the wellbeing of youth, that it can be used as a platform to make positive life changes.  The ethos of Transition Extreme charity is something I personally align with and felt impassioned to support architecturally. It also provided an opportunity to explore architecture and wellbeing in some depth, as well as, architecture and the human experience.

What is your best memory of the MArch course?

The best memories from my time on the course are from working within the 5710 society. Meeting and getting to know the visiting architects over dinner after their lectures. It has help me grow personally and has helped me develop my architectural thinking.

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The most challenging part was trying to navigate through integrating factors within this project. It is understood that the more meaning and connection a building has to the people using it the more its success a place may have. Research needed to transcend from purely design detail into understanding how people experience buildings, find comfort, ownership or pride for a space.

I was born and raised in a small village situated on the banks of the river Forth in Fife on the east coast of Scotland. Growing up I have always had a strong interest in making things and exploring how they are built which was on factor that enticed me towards architecture as a profession. I am very active in sports, previously a competitive international swimmer and enjoy various outdoor actives such as paddle boarding, wind surfing and climbing.

Through the course of my university degree, I have developed a passion for architecture in relation to its wider philosophical attitudes and its relationship with the humanities. I have explored this through a few written works, my dissertation achieving nomination for RIBA Dissertation Medal 2019.

Other interests include contributing to the conversations in architecture today. During the 2019/2020 academic session I was a chapter ember of ASA (Aberdeen Society of Architects) and was co-president of the 5710 Architectural Society.

Rachael O'Donnell

Unit One

2020

  • LinkedIn