What inspired you to create your proposal?

After spending my year out in practice at a housing developer, I was inspired to explore issues such as mass housing production and designing for improved well-being. I had known about the tower blocks that make up much of Seaton’s housing stock and began to wonder if there was a better way to improve living situations for the community there. Health and well-being can be seriously impacted by design and therefore I wanted to focus on improving the home environment as a means of assisting an entire community’s health and well-being from the root of the issue.

 

What is your best memory of the M.Arch course?

I don’t think there is any one memory that stands out for me but having the opportunity to be 57'10 President during my final year was an amazing experience. Creating a diverse calendar of speakers and meeting a great variety of people from within the industry that I have looked up to during my studies was incredible for me.

 

What is your architectural philosophy?

Architecture is all about people. As an integral part of our daily lives, architecture should always be considered on a human scale and we as designers should take into account the well-being of those who use not only our buildings but also the spaces between. It is about knowing that architecture can impact happiness.

 

Why did you choose to study architecture?

Growing up with civil engineers for parents and their passion for the construction industry, I have a practical sensibility but was encouraged to find a way to incorporate my creative nature as well. Architecture seemed a logical choice for me and my lifetime love of Lego!

 

Where do you see yourself in five years time?

As my project shows, housing is my passion in architecture and so I would love to be part of a small practice that designs homes improving residents’ well-being.

 

Who inspired you to become an architect?

No single person has inspired me to become an architect and instead a collection of things such as my practical but creative nature, my connection to the construction industry and my interest in buildings and design have all impacted my decision to pursue becoming an architect.

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The most challenging part of my project was creating homes that can be cost effective in both their production and throughout the building’s lifespan while also benefit the health and well-being of their residents. Creating a Passivhaus project that has a repetitive site plan with small features that can adapt and change the spaces between the buildings.

As a curious person, I have been lucky enough to discover many new cultures and explore some incredible places in my life through some amazing travel adventures. My family have always been keen travellers and growing up our family holidays were definitely unique experiences with us never returning to the same place twice. This drive to see the world has definitely been passed down to me, giving me an incredible passion for exploring new places, cultures and especially food. Before beginning my architectural education, I embarked on a six-month solo trip around the world and created some amazing memories that will last a lifetime from flying a jet in New Zealand to tasting the culinary delights of Singapore. Travel has helped to build my confidence, not only in myself and creativity but also in my ability to communicate and connect with other people. All of the incredible opportunities I have been given to explore the world, have shaped who I am and I can’t wait to see what my next adventure will be!

Lorna Robertson

Unit One

2020

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What inspired you to create your proposal?

After spending my year out in practice at a housing developer, I was inspired to explore issues such as mass housing production and designing for improved well-being. I had known about the tower blocks that make up much of Seaton’s housing stock and began to wonder if there was a better way to improve living situations for the community there. Health and well-being can be seriously impacted by design and therefore I wanted to focus on improving the home environment as a means of assisting an entire community’s health and well-being from the root of the issue.

 

What is your best memory of the M.Arch course?

I don’t think there is any one memory that stands out for me but having the opportunity to be 57'10 President during my final year was an amazing experience. Creating a diverse calendar of speakers and meeting a great variety of people from within the industry that I have looked up to during my studies was incredible for me.

 

What is your architectural philosophy?

Architecture is all about people. As an integral part of our daily lives, architecture should always be considered on a human scale and we as designers should take into account the well-being of those who use not only our buildings but also the spaces between. It is about knowing that architecture can impact happiness.

 

Why did you choose to study architecture?

Growing up with civil engineers for parents and their passion for the construction industry, I have a practical sensibility but was encouraged to find a way to incorporate my creative nature as well. Architecture seemed a logical choice for me and my lifetime love of Lego!

 

Where do you see yourself in five years time?

As my project shows, housing is my passion in architecture and so I would love to be part of a small practice that designs homes improving residents’ well-being.

 

Who inspired you to become an architect?

No single person has inspired me to become an architect and instead a collection of things such as my practical but creative nature, my connection to the construction industry and my interest in buildings and design have all impacted my decision to pursue becoming an architect.

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?

The most challenging part of my project was creating homes that can be cost effective in both their production and throughout the building’s lifespan while also benefit the health and well-being of their residents. Creating a Passivhaus project that has a repetitive site plan with small features that can adapt and change the spaces between the buildings.

As a curious person, I have been lucky enough to discover many new cultures and explore some incredible places in my life through some amazing travel adventures. My family have always been keen travellers and growing up our family holidays were definitely unique experiences with us never returning to the same place twice. This drive to see the world has definitely been passed down to me, giving me an incredible passion for exploring new places, cultures and especially food. Before beginning my architectural education, I embarked on a six-month solo trip around the world and created some amazing memories that will last a lifetime from flying a jet in New Zealand to tasting the culinary delights of Singapore. Travel has helped to build my confidence, not only in myself and creativity but also in my ability to communicate and connect with other people. All of the incredible opportunities I have been given to explore the world, have shaped who I am and I can’t wait to see what my next adventure will be!

Lorna Robertson

Unit One

2020

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  • LinkedIn