What inspired you to create your proposal?

I have always had an interest in challenging the ideology of death, and how this can be challenged in today’s society. Changing the transitional mundane concept of dull spaces for the last place of rest and creating architecture which embraces the celebration of life.

What is your best memory of the MArch course?

Study trips are one of the highlights of the course and is one of my favourite memories that will stay with me forever. Embracing new cultures, experiences and architecture styles offered a new insight into design approaches which otherwise would have been dismissed, and of course, the social events helped create long last memories.

 

What is your architectural philosophy?

I believe architecture has the opportunity to change how, as humans, we behave and react with architecture. Creating architecture around people is the key principle to understand how architecture can work collectively to improve the health and well-being of today’s society.

Why did you choose to study architecture?

From a young age, I have always been interested in design, form drawing sketches for my Nan as a young child. Through school, I moved away from the idea of becoming an architect and worked with a Civil and Structural engineering company, through designing my true interest of architecture shined through and made me realise I wanted to become an Architect.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

It is difficult to predict where I will be working within five years, as from the Coivd-19 pandemic it has shown that life can change so drastically within a short period of time. I would anticipate completing by Part 3 Examination to qualify as an architect, with the hope of starting my own practice.

Who inspired you to become an architect?

In the beginning, it was not one particular person who inspired me to become an architect, as a child I have always shown interest in drawing and designing. It was through the realisation of work experience and theory which made me realise pursuing a career in architecture was for me.

What was the most challenging part of your project?

Understanding the sensitivity of people during the worst time of their life was the most challenging impact of creating an urban crematorium proposal, to place myself in their situation of transitioning through the journey to pay their last respects to loved ones was the most difficult part to the project.

I am a self-motivated graduate from the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment who continues to take on new challenges to learn and develop within the profession. Applying my skills developed through University, and robust determination to the Master of Architecture degree, my studio work was previously nominated for the Jonathan Speirs Scholarship and achieved regional winner for the Krystyna Johnson Award. Through the skillset developed over six years of architecture studies, I believe quality architecture can be delivered through both solo and teamwork. Outwith studying architecture, cycling and charity runs are activities I pursue to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Jamie Parish

Unit One

2020

  • LinkedIn

What inspired you to create your proposal?

I have always had an interest in challenging the ideology of death, and how this can be challenged in today’s society. Changing the transitional mundane concept of dull spaces for the last place of rest and creating architecture which embraces the celebration of life.

What is your best memory of the MArch course?

Study trips are one of the highlights of the course and is one of my favourite memories that will stay with me forever. Embracing new cultures, experiences and architecture styles offered a new insight into design approaches which otherwise would have been dismissed, and of course, the social events helped create long last memories.

 

What is your architectural philosophy?

I believe architecture has the opportunity to change how, as humans, we behave and react with architecture. Creating architecture around people is the key principle to understand how architecture can work collectively to improve the health and well-being of today’s society.

Why did you choose to study architecture?

From a young age, I have always been interested in design, form drawing sketches for my Nan as a young child. Through school, I moved away from the idea of becoming an architect and worked with a Civil and Structural engineering company, through designing my true interest of architecture shined through and made me realise I wanted to become an Architect.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

It is difficult to predict where I will be working within five years, as from the Coivd-19 pandemic it has shown that life can change so drastically within a short period of time. I would anticipate completing by Part 3 Examination to qualify as an architect, with the hope of starting my own practice.

Who inspired you to become an architect?

In the beginning, it was not one particular person who inspired me to become an architect, as a child I have always shown interest in drawing and designing. It was through the realisation of work experience and theory which made me realise pursuing a career in architecture was for me.

What was the most challenging part of your project?

Understanding the sensitivity of people during the worst time of their life was the most challenging impact of creating an urban crematorium proposal, to place myself in their situation of transitioning through the journey to pay their last respects to loved ones was the most difficult part to the project.

I am a self-motivated graduate from the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment who continues to take on new challenges to learn and develop within the profession. Applying my skills developed through University, and robust determination to the Master of Architecture degree, my studio work was previously nominated for the Jonathan Speirs Scholarship and achieved regional winner for the Krystyna Johnson Award. Through the skillset developed over six years of architecture studies, I believe quality architecture can be delivered through both solo and teamwork. Outwith studying architecture, cycling and charity runs are activities I pursue to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Jamie Parish

Unit One

2020

  • LinkedIn