What inspired you to create your proposal?

From the groupwork research there was a real focus on people for the masterplan development and this was something that interested me. Throughout the previous years of studying architecture I had only ever done one other housing scheme, so I saw this as an opportunity to design another and felt it linked well with the idea of people, as we all need a place to live and the majority of projects in the real world now almost always seem to have some sort or residential aspect included within it so thought it would give me good experience. I also took inspiration from local contexts around Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire, such as Footdee, Crovie, Cullen and Pennan, looking at the layout and forms of these coastal places.

 

What is your best memory of the MArch course?

I wouldn’t say there was one standout memory but for me I enjoyed the annual study trips. They provided an amazing opportunity to explore other cultures and their architecture, something I think has really benefitted me throughout the course.

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?

Pursuing the idea of high-density housing. Trying to figure out how to create interesting spaces and good quality living with appropriate daylight and other similar factors with buildings very close to one another was difficult. It provided interesting conversations though and as challenging as it was, it was a rewarding process looking back.

 

Why did you choose to study architecture?

My dad is a joiner so I was used to hearing about buildings a lot and would often visit ones he was working on. I also enjoyed graphic communication in secondary school, so it was all just a natural progression from that and seemed like something I’d enjoy and would want to pursue a career in.

I have recently graduated from the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment in Aberdeen, attaining a Master of Architecture degree. Coming from a small town in the Scottish Highlands, my parents’ careers in the construction industry is no doubt what stemmed my initial interest in architecture, having experienced many building sites and drawings.

Sustainability has always been a primary interest of mine, especially within vernacular architecture, using proven technologies and design techniques that have long-lasting benefits for the user. It is something I am passionate towards and would like to gain deeper knowledge in as I move forward into my architectural career. Throughout my time at university I have developed a greater appreciation for art and very much love to travel, experiencing other cultures and their architecture.

Away from architecture I am a big sports fan, especially football, and have played in teams both in and out with school. I like to try and keep myself fit and active, and in recent years have picked up an interest in running.

Craig MacKenzie

Unit One

2020

  • LinkedIn

What inspired you to create your proposal?

From the groupwork research there was a real focus on people for the masterplan development and this was something that interested me. Throughout the previous years of studying architecture I had only ever done one other housing scheme, so I saw this as an opportunity to design another and felt it linked well with the idea of people, as we all need a place to live and the majority of projects in the real world now almost always seem to have some sort or residential aspect included within it so thought it would give me good experience. I also took inspiration from local contexts around Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire, such as Footdee, Crovie, Cullen and Pennan, looking at the layout and forms of these coastal places.

 

What is your best memory of the MArch course?

I wouldn’t say there was one standout memory but for me I enjoyed the annual study trips. They provided an amazing opportunity to explore other cultures and their architecture, something I think has really benefitted me throughout the course.

 

What was the most challenging part of your project?

Pursuing the idea of high-density housing. Trying to figure out how to create interesting spaces and good quality living with appropriate daylight and other similar factors with buildings very close to one another was difficult. It provided interesting conversations though and as challenging as it was, it was a rewarding process looking back.

 

Why did you choose to study architecture?

My dad is a joiner so I was used to hearing about buildings a lot and would often visit ones he was working on. I also enjoyed graphic communication in secondary school, so it was all just a natural progression from that and seemed like something I’d enjoy and would want to pursue a career in.

I have recently graduated from the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment in Aberdeen, attaining a Master of Architecture degree. Coming from a small town in the Scottish Highlands, my parents’ careers in the construction industry is no doubt what stemmed my initial interest in architecture, having experienced many building sites and drawings.

Sustainability has always been a primary interest of mine, especially within vernacular architecture, using proven technologies and design techniques that have long-lasting benefits for the user. It is something I am passionate towards and would like to gain deeper knowledge in as I move forward into my architectural career. Throughout my time at university I have developed a greater appreciation for art and very much love to travel, experiencing other cultures and their architecture.

Away from architecture I am a big sports fan, especially football, and have played in teams both in and out with school. I like to try and keep myself fit and active, and in recent years have picked up an interest in running.

Craig MacKenzie

Unit One

2020

  • LinkedIn